Video #5: Nikon Pure Photography, Savor Photography All Over Again

Posted Nov. 2nd, 2013 by Daniel J. Cox

Last night Nikon released their fifth video in the Nikon Pure Photography series. I have to say I’m liking what I see. You can finally get a good look at the camera they’re slowly introducing and it’s definitely retro. It’s interesting how the designs of new cameras are shifting towards what we used to use back in the “old days” The new Nikon definitely looks similar to my old F3 bodies I started out with in the 80s. I’m actually glad to see this return of the old ergonomics, or design layouts, we had before any of us even knew what the word “ergonomics” meant.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/IABlXuPDWWo[/youtube]

The old adage, what’s old is new again, is really taking hold in the camera business. I think it all began with cameras such as the Nikon D70 as well as some older and less sophisticated Canon models where dials for selecting the Exposure Mode replaced the push button, dial it in on the LCD options.

Nikon's D70s incorporated a dial for changing the Exposure Mode which looked and felt similar to the old F3's dial to change Shutter Speeds.

Nikon’s D70s incorporated a dial for changing the Exposure Mode which looked and felt similar to the old F3’s dial to change Shutter Speeds.

Olympus then took the lead in retro  with their release of the OM-D EM-5. Later they upped the anti in back to the future styling and features with their newest Micro Four Thirds version of the recently released E-M1.

Comparison photo of recent Olympus cameras with retro styling the OM-D EM-5 and the newest Olympus EM-1. Photo courtesy Micro Four Thirds Blog.

Comparison photo of recent Olympus cameras with retro styling the OM-D EM-5 and the newest Olympus EM-1. Photo courtesy Micro Four Thirds Blog.

Inline with the popularity of bringing back cameras of the past, Sony , just two weeks ago, introduces the A7 and the A7R. Both so called Full Frame cameras with a definite design that harkens back to days gone by.

Sony's new A7 Mirrorless camera with a 24 megapixel sensor. Nice looking camera and even better when you see it in action

Sony’s new A7 Mirrorless camera with a 24 megapixel sensor. Nice looking camera and even better when you see it in action

I’m loving the return of the top deck dials. It’s taken many years for the manufacturers to realize the benefits of having your control options always visible, ready to be changed at a moment’s notice.  As I mentioned earlier, what’s old is new again and Nikon may just have a serious hit on their hands if they can give us the technology we want in a package that’s easier to use and fun to look at. We’ll know more on October 4th or 5th when the camera is supposed to be officially announced.

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  1. DeanOn Nov. 2nd, 2013

    Do you wonder some times if all the new “technology” distracts us from the simple purity of photographing nature? I don’t want to have to drill down through a menu to set the camera functions. I couple quick “clicks” of a dial on top of the body not only makes one feel more “attached” to the camera, but even that pleasant, gentle sound adds to the mood of a beautiful scene. Similarly, aren’t there times when you just want to feel the weight of a book in your hands as you casually turn the pages instead of flipping through pages on a tablet with the side stroke of a finger? Same thing goes for cameras. Perhaps I am getting too old for all the “electronics.” I just want a simple camera that helps me take simple and breathtaking photos. I want to focus (double entendre intended) on my subjects, not my camera gear. Let’s hope the new Nikon lets us go back in time with a camera that has the image quality of a D800E! We can still dream, can’t we?

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