Battling to Preserve Your Photo Rights

Posted Mar. 8th, 2013 by Daniel J. Cox

As many of you know, I began a battle a few months ago to stop the world from removing photographer’s contact information from our photos when uploading images to the web. If you’re a photographer posting your pictures online to sites like Facebook, Flikr, LinkedIn etc., you should read these following Blog Posts detailing how photographers are losing control of their precious images due to the stripping of contact information known as metadata.

Campaign Monitor's image uploading service was stripping all Contact Information formerly known as Metadata from photos. After contacting them they immediately looked in to the issue and I'm happy to say they changed their policy and technology to stop the stripping. One small victory. One million more to go.

Campaign Monitor’s image uploading service was stripping all Contact Information known as Metadata from photos. After contacting them they immediately looked in to the issue and I’m happy to say they changed their policy and technology to stop the stripping. One small victory. One million more to go.

I’m pleased to say we’ve had one small but significant victory. Recently we sent out one of our promotional emails we call Natural Notes. Each Natural Note contains a favorite image of mine. Little did I know, in the process of uploading the images used in our Natural Note emails, the email company we’re using, Campaign Monitor, was stripping all Contact Information from our pictures. This was brought to my attention after a good friend of ours, Susan McElhinney of the National Wildlife Federation, contacted me. Susan and I had lunch a day earlier and I mentioned to her this issue all photographers are facing. During our lunch I shared with her the situation that took place last summer with Thompson Reuters. Susan pulled the photo of the flying puffin from the email to her desktop, opened it, and found it contained NO Contact Information. We contacted Campaign Monitor and they’ve done their part to help all photographers retain the rights to their images. Click on this link to find out how you can preserve your Photo Rights.

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