Lexar Calls It Quits, No Surprise Here

Posted Jun. 28th, 2017 by Daniel J. Cox

Yesterday, Lexar made what some are calling a “bombshell” announcement: they will stop producing Lexar cards and other Lexar memory/storage devices. All I can say is, it doesn’t surprise me. On the company’s official blog, a post was written by Jay Hawkins, VP of Micron. He states, “The company will continue to provide support to existing customers through this transition period. “What customer support?” is my first reaction.

My first use of the speedy Lexar SD-UHS-ll cards.

Based on my experience with Lexar, they have no customer service. Their demise doesn’t surprise me in the least because of the nonexistent interest in supporting their customers. I experienced this firsthand with the company. Case in point is my blog post Lexar or SanDisk: You Decide. I won’t go through all the reasons why I’m not surprised Lexar is finally biting the dust in this blog; that blog post explains it pretty well. But it is sad that there will be one less player in the field.

I wonder if Jay Hawkins had anything to do with customer care?

My guess is card prices will increase and we’ll have fewer choices. But on the bright side, maybe there should be fewer players if some are unwilling to have any dialog with or interest in the people using their products. SanDisk will be the major winner, and they’ll be rewarded with even more sales. Their tech and customer support is superb, so maybe they should be rewarded with an even bigger market share. Lexar’s product quality used to be the best. But their quality changed AND they had nobody interested in the people side of things. Wtih that dismal combination, there certainly is no place other than down for any company.

 

 

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There are 14 comments on this post…
  1. Dan CarrOn Jul. 4th, 2017 (1 month ago)

    Strangely, I had completely the opposite experience as you. Lexar FedExed me a replacement card when one failed, having had a 2 minute chat with an online support agent. SanDisk required weeks of back and forth emailing and eventually I threw in the towel and gave up.

    • Portrait of Daniel J. Cox

      Daniel J. CoxOn Jul. 5th, 2017 (1 month ago)

      Thanks for your input Dan. Who knows, maybe my experience with Lexar was an anomaly. In the end, SanDisk is moving forward and Lexar has called it quits. Somewhere along the line people weren’t supporting Lexar enough for them to continue selling their products.

  2. James BrunkerOn Jul. 2nd, 2017 (2 months ago)

    I’ve used mainly SanDisk for many years and have never had a problem with their cards. I’ve also got a few Kingston cards (used to be easier to find in South America than SanDisk) and those have always worked fine as well.

  3. GlennOn Jun. 30th, 2017 (2 months ago)

    I’m sure I’m an outlier but I buy Lexar cards at Big Lots all the time. The only one I ever had fail was when I used the photo machine at Walmart. Completely bricked it. I’ve used them extensively in my Nikon D3200 and D600. Never an issue. Sad to see them go.

    • Portrait of Daniel J. Cox

      Daniel J. CoxOn Jun. 30th, 2017 (2 months ago)

      Thaks for your input Glenn.

    • Louis BerkOn Jul. 2nd, 2017 (2 months ago)

      I’m with Glenn, I’ve had a lot of problems with cards from another manufacturer which seems to dominate the market. So much so that I’ve used anything but. I have 3 high performance Lexar cards which I use in my Panasonic cameras and they work perfectly. I also use Transcend and Kingston. I’m sorry to see Lexar go and I hope it is not a trend so that only the one manufacturer I’d prefer not to use is left.

  4. DeanOn Jun. 30th, 2017 (2 months ago)

    Never had any issues with CF or SD cards from either SanDisk or Lexar (or, in the early years – – D1 and D1x – – with Kingston). The only card I ever had go south on me was a Transcend 16GB 600X CF ($145 in 2010). I lost a few dozen images (completely garbled and random, crazy pixels) in the middle of a 200 or so image walrus shoot in Svalbard . . . made me sick. And, tech support from Transcend was absolutely the pits! Transcend wanted to blame my Nikon D3X for the failure when it was clearly a defective card! Transcend eventually replaced the card, but even with several different “rescue” program attempts, those dozens of photos were lost.

    • Portrait of Daniel J. Cox

      Daniel J. CoxOn Jun. 30th, 2017 (2 months ago)

      Thanks for your input Dean. Looks like we’ll be stuck with one major and a few minor players now. Guess it will be SanDisk and possibly Sony, then Transcend, Delkin, and Kingston? Would love to hear from anyone who’s had experience with Delkin or others. Delkin seems to be the brand lots of smaller photo shops are carrying. Not sure how trustworthy Delkin is. Would love to have some feedback.

  5. ckuhnOn Jun. 29th, 2017 (2 months ago)

    Never had any issues with Lexar beginning with Canon Original 10D, 5D, 5D Mark III, 5D Mark IV. Always got more memory for $$$ and NEVER ask or needed support. They will be missed in my opinion.

    • Portrait of Daniel J. Cox

      Daniel J. CoxOn Jun. 30th, 2017 (2 months ago)

      Thanks for your input Chuck. I also started with Lexar many years ago with the onset of digital capture and they were great. Never did experience any issues until about three years ago.

  6. ToddOn Jun. 28th, 2017 (2 months ago)

    I’ve never used Lexar and have stick with ScanDisk for all my digital cameras. I’ve honestly have never had any issues with my cards Over the past 10!years.

    • Portrait of Daniel J. Cox

      Daniel J. CoxOn Jun. 29th, 2017 (2 months ago)

      I guess that’s at least one reason why SanDisk has survived and Lexar is now dead. The other was the dismal support Lexar offered but that’ all water under the bridge now. Thanks for stopping by to add your voice Todd.

  7. John MorganOn Jun. 28th, 2017 (2 months ago)

    Is something coming along that will take the place of memory cards?

    • Portrait of Daniel J. Cox

      Daniel J. CoxOn Jun. 29th, 2017 (2 months ago)

      That’s a good question, John. Who knows. Anything is possible in this era of digital photography.

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